Bypass Repeated Content

the final resting place

Lorch Monastery

Porträt Eduard Mörike, Gemälde um 1850; Foto: Landesmedienzentrum Baden-Württemberg, Hans Steinhorst
A poet's enjoyment

Mörike and

the health resort of Lorch

"But it is true that, notwithstanding food and drink, I live here almost purely from my enjoyment of the area, particularly the air..." the poet Eduard Mörike (1804-1875) 1867 enthused about Lorch. Thanks to the lively letter-writing culture of the 19th century, his descriptions have been preserved to this day.

Eduard Mörike with a book, detail of a photograph by F. Brandesph, 1875. Image: Landesmedienzentrum Baden-Württemberg, credit unknown

Mörike kept a "house book" with his personal notes.

The "house book" of Lorch

The Romantic poet and writer was an artist with many gifts. He wrote down his impressions in a "house book" that he decorated with little drawings. One of the most famous depicts a rather strange creative pastime. Mörike wrote that he had "allowed himself the fun of having his drawings and words engraved on the potter's work." He gave these ceramics decorated with his verses to his friends and family. Today, the "house book" is protected at the German Literature Archive in Marbach.

Lorch, a health resort

In the 19th century, Lorch and its monastery attracted many travelers. With the opening of the Remsbahn railroad, more and more tourists came to improve their health and spend their summer at a resort, providing a source of income for the citizens of Lorch. Beginning in 1871, an beautification club maintained hiking paths and park benches, created a swimming area on the Rems river, and improved the appearance of the streets. Up to the 1930s, advertisements for Lorch as a health resort focused on the good air and climate, the lovely landscape, and the local sights.